Capturing Bodyscapes

Photography in itself is an immensely vast oasis of capturing moments, objects, faces, places and just about everything expressed by the human eyes through a lens. Jean Paul Bourdier is a French photographer who has accomplished a unique culmination of landscapes and human form in his very experimental style of photographic series titled ‘ Bodyscapes’. This collection of photographs plays freely with ideas of the human body merging with its surroundings, compelling the viewer to experience serene camouflage, creating brilliant visual interaction between the human body and mother nature.

Bourdier takes a whole new approach to body art, steering away from the usual portrayals of nude figures with typical ornamentation such as piercings and tattoos; rather, the photographer paints over his human subjects, rendering them a part of the environment in which they are shot. Painting elements of nature and scenes from landscapes on to their very bodies in the absence of digital manipulation, Jean Paul Bourdier immortalizes these scenes by unifying primal forms, natural textures and raw scenes to create earthly and organic compositions.

In engaging performance of the human form with natural surroundings, the photographer gives birth to unique harmony between man and nature acting as one. Bourdier puts together a refreshing mix of painting, people and landscape in his photographs rendering them in to one single creative category, all the while pushing their creative limits.

In the words of Jean Paul Bourdier himself, is an understanding of his inspiration with the human form in his compositions:

…Arising in each visual event conceived are the geometries generated by the body as a determinant of ‘negative space’—not the background of the figure and the field surrounding it, but the space that makes composition and framing possible in photography. As an organizer of space, the body also serves as a primary measuring unit, by which one perceives and constructs one’s environment. Such an approach can be linked to the practices of literally using the body as a first unit of measurement, which were not only common to the building of vernacular architecture around the world but were also at work in the temples of India, Egypt and Greece, for example.

body of wind

body of wind

you and I

you and I

couple mirage

couple mirage

hitchhiking

hitchhiking

one stroke mountain bow

one stroke mountain bow

red and blue interface

red and blue interface

boxed in

boxed in

somnambulists

somnambulists

the other side

the other side

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