"Tekken 3 APK Download Best Android Fighting Game Free"
"Discuss with Us on Our Forums"
"30+ Short Love Poems For Her That Will Make Her Cry"

How To Build Your Reputation And Authority As A Designer

  • How To Build Your Reputation And Authority As A Designer
    [See the full post at: How To Build Your Reputation And Authority As A Designer]

    Reply
  •  Mostaque Ahammed

    It’s a great article. I’ve one point to add with all of them.
    Networking. It’s such a way to Build Reputation And Authority. So, I will say, Always Be Networking.

    Reply
  •  Val Woodhouse

    Thanks for the article. I do a lot of what you suggest already but still no-one’s taking the bait. This is such a fast-moving industry that I feel every day that passes without me landing my break is one day further from me achieving my potential. In the end there’s no alternative to some understanding client taking a chance on a newbie rather than going for someone with an established track record.

    Reply
  •  wparena

    All are valid points but the thing is, who is following, he is a designer and rest of them are not 🙂 isn’t it strange… these are our rules otherwise designers exist in this world

    Reply
  •  Brian McDaniel

    Thanks for the input, Mostaque. You are correct, and I think I’m saying the same thing about networking, but more about the online ways to network. 🙂

    Reply
  •  Brian McDaniel

    It took me over 6 months of working at the elements I wrote about before I started seeing tangible results within my business. While I was doing that I was finding work and clients with other methods (Craigslist, classifieds, word of mouth, etc.) I think you’re right that many clients will prefer a “known” or reputable designer, but that’s part of why you would want to build your reputation WHILE you are building your track record.

    Hope that helps. Thanks for the comment.

    Reply
  •  Victor De Anda

    Great tips, Brian!

    I find your concept of the leveled playing field very interesting. I know I’ve had success “friending” better known designers through social media.

    Now I’ve got to build on these relationships in order to grow my network.

    Keep up the good work!

    Reply
  •  Josh Shindler

    It is a really good article, but I always question the need to build your reputation within the design community. I suppose if you were trying to get a job within the design community then it will definitely help, otherwise isn’t it just about ego.
    As designers we all have this need to be praised and feel good about our work. We need to be recognised. I’m not sure that is the case across other industries that don’t deal with such a visual medium.

    Reply
  •  JC

    Nice article…I think that being seen as an expert can help gain jobs…but only if your work is good enough too…can’t have one without the other!

    Reply
  •  Ingo de Jonge

    What do you guys think?For a designer/programmer freelancer, a facebook “fan page” or a “normal” facebook account?

    Reply
  •  Judith Vermeij

    Look at me: “I’m Saturating With Social Media, already!!!”
    Hope it turns out well….

    Reply
  •  Brian McDaniel

    Thanks for pointing that out, JC. I was writing under the assumption that the work being produced is obviously good enough to get hired, and the rest of this would go hand in hand with it. But it’s never a good idea to assume that everyone knows what I’m thinking. 😉

    Reply
  •  Brian McDaniel

    I think that’s a good question, Josh. I was not specifically speaking about building your reputation ONLY within the design community, because then, of course, it would not have as much impact on getting hired. That said, there are benefits beyond feeding one’s ego. I have found that the more established I become within the community, the more I learn from others, connect and engage with other people, and discover more opportunities – not just for new clients but for things such as a chance to write on this blog. A year ago no one was interested in having me write for their blogs because they had no idea I existed. But now I have been asked to write for several design blogs, and other similar opportunities have presented themselves as well, all because I worked at establishing and growing my reputation. I’m comfortable enough with my life and my work to not have any need for feeding my ego, but feeding my family is always a priority, and for me, these methods have contributed to that.

    Reply
  •  Jessica

    Great article and advice, thanks!

    Reply
  •  Steph

    It would be nice if I had time for blogging, but it certainly lends itself to a personal goal: better speaking!

    Reply
  •  Stacy

    Thanks so much for writing such a helpful and insightful article, Brian. When I first joined twitter back in 2007, I only did it to follow a co-worker who was tweeting updates from SXSW. After that, I did not pay much attention to my account. About 6 months ago, I decided to give twitter another try. I am so glad that I did. It is such a valuable resource for not only information, but for all of the other reasons you listed in your article. Building your reputation takes time, but I believe that it’s worth every minute of it. It’s definitely a work in progress for me, and I appreciate you sharing your insights with us.

    Reply
  •  Boris Smirnov

    Great Post Brian. I have tried multiple times to maintain a blog, but sometimes I when I get home from work blogging is a last thing on my mind. I find that I often suffer from “Plummers sink always leaks” syndrome, though this is more of an excuse then a reason.

    Reply
  •  Alexander Kahl

    Well, I started blogging a few times, unfortunatly I ended up stretching the dates between my articles. So, in the end I gave up after a few months.

    Nevertheless, I think this article might help me a bit to understand what I was missing: social media. I didn’t even know about Twitter at all 😀 Plus only a hand full of people read my articles now and then.

    Next time I try harder to make my special design blog more interesting 🙂 Thanks for sharing your experiences!

    Reply
  •  aravind ajith

    Nice read! Really valuable points.
    What I really liked in this post are the titles.
    Well done.

    Reply
  •  Jessica Taylor

    Very awesome article! Thank you for being so inspiring!

    Reply
  •  Debt Consolidation

    interesting post @Brian McDaniel making reputation online is very difficult for every one either its a company or a person, to make their reputation they need  Be Prolific, be ubiquitous, be generous, be dependable and be credible. they you make your perfect reputation online or offline.

    Reply

Reply To: How To Build Your Reputation And Authority As A Designer




<a href="" title="" rel="" target=""> <blockquote cite=""> <code> <pre> <em> <strong> <del datetime=""> <ul> <ol start=""> <li> <img src="" border="" alt="" height="" width="">

CLOSE